Posts Tagged ‘WWI’

The E.C.B.-I.M.F. bailout being compared to TARP and the fall of the Greek’s government’s solvency capacity’s parallels to the domino fall that became the Great Depression.

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Anthony Gregory at The Independent Institute blog, The Beacon, on the ‘progressive’ media’s embrace of government thugs at war with people.

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Darian Worden discusses the left-libertarian umbrella over libertarian socialism, anarcho-syndicalism, mutualism and agorism—its history through the 19th century French Revolution at the inception of self-proclaimed anarchists, the early works of Murray Rothbard and Samuel E. Konkin III, the meanings  and significance of ‘left’ and ‘right’ prefixes—at the 2010 New Hampshire Liberty Forum Alt Expo (27:47):

Part One (10:01):

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In a lecture from 15 Mar 89 that’s more relevant today than ever, Prof. Chomsky provides an in-depth discussion of the “propaganda model” of “historical engineering, thought control and indoctrination” used by the “liberal intellectual class” to “feed the masses”, discussed in the book, co-authored with Ed Herman, Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media — (in our opinion) one of the most, if not the most, important political science works of the modern day — followed by Q&A. (more…)

A 1984 speech by Dr. Murray N. Rothbard. (more…)


American Foreign Policy

World News

National News


A public talk with Robert Fisk — introduced by Noam Chomsky.

Wikipedia– Robert Fisk:

Robert Fisk (born July 12, 1946 in Maidstone, Kent) is an award-winning British journalist and author. He is the Middle East correspondent of the UK newspaper The Independent, and has spent more than 30 years living in and reporting from the region. [1]

Fisk has been described in the New York Times as “probably the most famous foreign correspondent in Britain.” [2] He covered the Northern Ireland Troubles in the 1970s, the Portuguese Revolution in 1974, the 1975-1990 Lebanese Civil War, the 1979 Iranian revolution, the 1980-88 Iran–Iraq War, the 1991 Gulf War, and the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. He has received numerous awards, including the British Press AwardsInternational Journalist of the Year award seven times. Fisk speaks vernacular Arabic, and is one of the few Western journalists to have interviewed Osama bin Laden – three times between 1994 and 1997.[3] [4]

Fisk has said that journalism must “challenge authority — all authority — especially so when governments and politicians take us to war.” He has quoted with approval the Israeli journalist Amira Hass: “There is a misconception that journalists can be objective … What journalism is really about is to monitor power and the centres of power.” [5]

He has written at length on how much of contemporary conflict has, in his view, its origin in lines drawn on maps: “After the allied victory of 1918, at the end of my father’s war, the victors divided up the lands of their former enemies. In the space of just seventeen months, they created the borders of Northern Ireland, Yugoslavia and most of the Middle East. And I have spent my entire career — in Belfast and Sarajevo, in Beirut and Baghdad — watching the people within those borders burn.” [6]

Robert Fisk discusses the Middle East after a lengthy topic preface from Prof. Noam Chomsky. Mr. Fisk and Prof. Chomsky take questions after Mr. Fisk’s lecture.

Mr. Fisk is an amazing storyteller with an extremely sharp mind and open heart, making him one of my favorite journalists and lecturers.

War, Geopolitics, History: Conflict in the Middle East” (1:41:44):





from AntiWar.com:

Arguably the most successful act of revolutionary terror was the June 1914 assassination of the Archduke Francis Ferdinand in Sarajevo.

Believing his mission to murder the heir to the Austrian throne had failed, Gavrilo Princip suddenly found himself standing a few feet away from the royal car. He fired twice, mortally wounding the archduke and his wife.

Tactically, that act of terror eliminated the reformist Ferdinand, who meant to address the grievances of his Slav subjects by granting them greater autonomy and equality with Austrians and Hungarians inside the empire.

Strategically, the assassination succeeded beyond the wildest dreams of its Black Hand plotters.

Hard-liners in Austria demanded an ultimatum to Serbia. When her demands were not met in full, Vienna declared war. Czar Nicholas mobilized in support of Russia’s little Slav brothers. The Kaiser ordered mobilization. When the French refused to declare neutrality, Germany declared war. In hours, the British Cabinet had reversed itself to back war with Germany on behalf of Belgium and France.

Princip had lit the fuse that set off in six weeks the greatest war in history. While Serbia suffered per capita losses as great as any other nation, she ended the Great War as the lead nation in a Kingdom of the South Slavs embracing Slovenes, Croats, Bosnians, Albanians, Montenegrins, Macedonians, and Hungarians. The Habsburg Empire at which Princip had struck had vanished.

Last week’s Mumbai massacre seems a similar triumph of terror…

[read the full article here]

This is an amazing account of history, its relation to the current climate in the Indo-Pak region following the Mumbai attacks, and how terror snowballs into massive wars and means-justifying-ends atrocities. Mr. Buchanan makes a great case that war is a victory for terrorism.

If you haven’t read Buchanan’s Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War, it’s an amazing work for anyone interested in WWII history, international relations, and non-interventionism.