Posts Tagged ‘wage slavery’

News and views from around the web posted to the Wonderland Wire:

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News and views from around the web posted to the Wonderland Wire:

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via Charles “Rad Geek” Johnson’s blog: Freedom is not a conservative idea. It is not a prop for corporate power and the political-economic statist quo. Libertarianism is, in fact, a revolutionary doctrine, which would undermine and overthrow every form of state coercion and authoritarian control. If we want liberty in our lifetimes, the realities of our politics need to live up to the promise our principles—we should be radicals, not reformists; anarchists, not smaller-governmentalists; defenders of real freed markets and private property, not apologists for corporate capitalism, halfway privatization or existing concentrations of wealth. Libertarianism should be a people’s movement and a liberation movement, and we should take our cues not from what’s politically polite, but from what works for a revolutionary people-power movement. Here’s how:

Part One (10:00):

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Historian and writer Tariq Ali and Professor Noam Chomsky speak in London 29 October 2009 on U.S. hypocrisy toward Iran,  U.S. occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan, the Israeli occupation of Palestine, the U.S. role as Israel’s enabler and ‘mafia godfather’, Palestinian leadership’s ‘collaboration’ with the U.S. and Israel against a ‘solution’, international law, the hopes for peace in the near future and the double game the Obama Administration plays with its rhetoric and contrary actions. Mr. Ali begins speaking around the 7:00 mark, Prof Chomsky around the 21:00 mark and a Q&A follows where he suggests a “no-state solution” as “the best solution for the whole world”. (1:57:40):

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Daily Kos

The New York Times’ (NYT) New Years Eve editorial of 2008 commented on Sen. Jim Webb’s (D-VA) call for criminal justice reform. On top of the typical NYT ignorant statement that “billions of dollars now being spent on prisons each year could be used in far more socially productive ways,” instead of the logical statement that billions of dollars that don’t exist that can’t be repaid are being borrowed at interest to waste within our prison system, contributing to the hidden, most regressive tax in US monetary policy — inflation — the editorial doesn’t make the most logical (yet, simplest)  proposal to reform the US criminal justice system: cut crime.

What’s the easiest, cheapest, most efficient way to have less crime? Less laws. Something can’t be criminal if there’s no law prohibiting it.

The NYT’s own International Herald Tribune (IHT) published an article further exposing US prison population statistics that would make anyone raise their eyebrows:

The United States has less than 5 percent of the world’s population. But it has almost a quarter of the world’s prisoners.

The United States has, for instance, 2.3 million criminals behind bars, more than any other nation, according to data maintained by the International Center for Prison Studies at King’s College London.

China, which is four times more populous than the United States, is a distant second, with 1.6 million people in prison. (That number excludes hundreds of thousands of people held in administrative detention, most of them in China’s extrajudicial system of re-education through labor, which often singles out political activists who have not committed crimes.)

San Marino, with a population of about 30,000, is at the end of the long list of 218 countries compiled by the center. It has a single prisoner.

The United States comes in first, too, on a more meaningful list from the prison studies center, the one ranked in order of the incarceration rates. It has 751 people in prison or jail for every 100,000 in population. (If you count only adults, one in 100 Americans is locked up.)

The median among all nations is about 125, roughly a sixth of the American rate.

… The United States, in fact, has relatively low rates of nonviolent crime. It has lower burglary and robbery rates than Australia, Canada and England.

People who commit nonviolent crimes in the rest of the world are less likely to receive prison time and certainly less likely to receive long sentences. The United States is, for instance, the only advanced country that incarcerates people for minor property crimes like passing bad checks, [James Whitman, a specialist in comparative law at Yale] wrote.

Efforts to combat illegal drugs play a major role in explaining long prison sentences in the United States as well. In 1980, there were about 40,000 people in American jails and prisons for drug crimes. These days, there are almost 500,000.

Change.org ranks the legalization of marijuana and ending the drug war higher in vote tally than other government policies that defy common sense and liberty like ending corporate personhood, repealing the Patriot [sic] Act, and reversing Pres. Bush’s decider-in-chief Executive Orders.

The September 2008 Zogby/Inter-American Dialogue Survey found that:

  • 76% of American voters believed that War on Drugs was failing, including 89% of those who intended to vote for Barack Obama in the coming months.
  • 27% of likely voters favored legalization of, at least, “some drugs” as the best approach.
  • 13% believed “that the best way to fight the war on drugs is to prevent production of narcotics in the country of origin.”

Bear in mind that this is highly indoctrinated public that isn’t, in any way, well informed when 76% view the War on Drugs’ progress in such a negative fashion and only 27% favor some legalization. Imagine if the people were better informed of the US’s embarrassing prison population and the tens of billions wasted every year to maintain it. Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron estimated “that legalizing drugs could save federal, state and local governments in the United States about $44 billion per year.” (This doesn’t include the billions to fund the war internationally.)

The biggest US funded drug war failure, outside of the atrocities committed to prop up dictators playing the drug war game and violently removing them from power when the CIA was done with them, is Mexico. The Mexican government continues to play our [sic] game, in theory and rhetoric, but government officials at every level of the hierarchy are overtly playing both sides of the coin and the drug cartels have infiltrated the Mexican attorney general’s office.

Mexicans polled by the BBC showed:

  • Thirty-seven per cent of those surveyed said the influence of the drugs cartels had made them think of leaving Mexico.
  • Drug trafficking was considered the second most important concern in their lives after corruption.
  • Drugs came above worries about the economy, general crime, education and social inequality.

According to the survey results, an apparently contradictory picture emerges of whether Mexicans agree with the government’s policy on fighting the drugs war.

  • More than half of those surveyed (53%) thought the government was doing better than last year
  • A strong majority (68%) agreed with the policy of involving the military in the fight against drug trafficking
  • More than half (58%) thought the war on drugs could be won.

However, an overwhelming majority (80%) thought the government should consider seeking other alternatives to end the problem. The respondents were also divided on whether the legalisation of drugs should be considered – 44% said yes, and 46% said no.

El Universal, a daily Mexican publication, estimates 8,463 deaths in the Mexican Drug War since the beginning of 2007.

With over $10 trillion in debt, another $10 trillion to fly off the printing press through recent bailouts, nearly $1 trillion to be printed in an Obama stimulus package, and Americans barely being able to heat their homes, let alone stay in them, and these are American tax dollars and debts at work.

One must wonder — with all of this loss and no gain in the drug war and overpopulated prisons in the US — why?

Enter a world of slavery that eclipses the theoretical postulations of wage-slavery: prison labor:

Human rights organizations, as well as political and social ones, are condemning what they are calling a new form of inhumane exploitation in the United States, where they say a prison population of up to 2 million – mostly Black and Hispanic – are working for various industries for a pittance. For the tycoons who have invested in the prison industry, it has been like finding a pot of gold. They don’t have to worry about strikes or paying unemployment insurance, vacations or comp time. All of their workers are full-time, and never arrive late or are absent because of family problems; moreover, if they don’t like the pay of 25 cents an hour and refuse to work, they are locked up in isolation cells.

“The private contracting of prisoners for work fosters incentives to lock people up. Prisons depend on this income. Corporate stockholders who make money off prisoners’ work lobby for longer sentences, in order to expand their workforce. The system feeds itself,” says a study by the Progressive Labor Party, which accuses the prison industry of being “an imitation of Nazi Germany with respect to forced slave labor and concentration camps.”

The prison industry complex is one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States and its investors are on Wall Street. “This multimillion-dollar industry has its own trade exhibitions, conventions, websites, and mail-order/Internet catalogs. It also has direct advertising campaigns, architecture companies, construction companies, investment houses on Wall Street, plumbing supply companies, food supply companies, armed security, and padded cells in a large variety of colors.”

According to the Left Business Observer, the federal prison industry produces 100% of all military helmets, ammunition belts, bullet-proof vests, ID tags, shirts, pants, tents, bags, and canteens. Along with war supplies, prison workers supply 98% of the entire market for equipment assembly services; 93% of paints and paintbrushes; 92% of stove assembly; 46% of body armor; 36% of home appliances; 30% of headphones/microphones/speakers; and 21% of office furniture. Airplane parts, medical supplies, and much more: prisoners are even raising seeing-eye dogs for blind people. [read the full article]

Laws that criminalize acts that don’t infringe on the natural rights of others serve no purpose other than to empower the State. The State is a monopoly of morality where you can dissent, in many cases, but to defy means running the risk of being confined. The State makes the laws and those that don’t consent to follow certain laws and don’t violate any individuals are violently coerced into submitting to tyrannical majoritarianism — under the Newspeak guise of the word ‘democracy’.

You’ve just seen for yourself how the State steals from us our natural sovereignty to make decisions for ourselves with the end result of slavery right here in 2009. You’ve read why Mexicans flood to leave their country and become another class of slave labor in the US. These are relatively small percentages of the habitats within the US borders, but in theory, US law applies to all and if a law’s nature is to exploit one person’s individual sovereignty, under tyrannical majoritarianism, that law exploits all who tacitly consent because the existence of a law serves as its legimitacy. Therefore, the oppressive law can used as precedent to justify a law that exploits anyone.

If that nature is slavery, we’re all enslaved because we’re robbed of our voice, our choice, our consent.

What makes you so special?:



The free market can never truly be free without the workers free to assemble and organize to demand and negotiate the price of their labor supply. But, compulsory assembly is coercive. It’s tyrannical when it comes from the unions and a gross abuse of power when it comes from the State.

I’m about as pro-union as it gets, but more importantly, I’m a voluntaryist. No one who stands for liberty can stand for the absolute authority of 50+1 tyranny of the majority and no one for liberty can not stand against the Employee Free Choice [sic] Act (EFCA).

The EFCA (or HR 800) is proposed legislation by Democrats which would “amend the National Labor Relations Act to establish an efficient system to enable employees to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to provide for mandatory injunctions for unfair labor practices during organizing efforts, and for other purposes.”

It sounds like a great idea, right? It sounds as if it expands workers’ rights to unionize.

Nope.

What EFCA does is refuse a corporation to hold secret ballots among their workers. Sounds like it takes the workers’ right to unionize from the hands of the bosses and hands it to the workers, right?

Nope.

The EFCA has what’s called a “card check” policy whereby workers vote to unionize by signing their names. Every union organizer lobbying for a workforce would then have the names of those who voted against unionizing.

Worse, this puts workers’ fates in the hands of the National Labor Relations Board — a federal agency that gets lobbied and paid off by all sides of the same coins, just like the rest of the federal agencies.

Rev. Al Sharpton has been speaking out against the EFCA on his radio show:

Yeah, well, what I don’t understand about it which is why I’m in the campaign is why wouldn’t those of us who support workers being protected, why would we not want their privacy protected? I mean why would we want them opened up to this kind of possible coercion?

… clearly I’m for any legislation to give any state the right to organize, but I’m talking about specifically where workers are not protected from coercion, in terms of these card-checks that you talk about, and as arbitration because explain, Charlie King, to me the whole question that you raised, if you have a federal arbitrator who says that this is the deal, even when the union only established out of card-check, is the deal for two years, and there’s nothing you can do about it, I mean, a lot of the business that we afford for the African American community to get contracts and sub contracts and all. They could face some very serious problems here.

and Fmr. Sen. and 1972 Democratic Party presidential candidate George McGovern spoke powerfully against the EFCA in an ad released a month before the election:

Surely, the president-elect wouldn’t sign a such a coercive bill against workers?

Yup.

Mr. Obama told the AFL-CIO last April that he will “make it the law of the land when [he’s] president of the United States.”

What gets caught up in the Newspeak is the assumption that if you’re pro-EFCA, you’re pro-Big Labor, making you pro-worker. This is false, as no one in the MSM wishes to discuss what hinders workers from having more freedom to choose and dispose of their representation and their methods of non-violent, non-coercive negotiating: the Taft-Hartley Act, which was called the “slave labor bill” when it was passed in 1947 and is still a part of American law.

The government shouldn’t have agencies picking winners and losers between bosses, union organizers, and individual workers. For one, government’s nothing more than a window breaker when it enters the marketplace, but more importantly, the individual workers don’t have the big Beltway lobbying firms representing them. The worker is forced to depend on the union they have and if they don’t like their representation, the difficulties of unionizing make forming new unions not worth the effort because (remember) the Big Labor that already exists has a primary objective of keeping their power over the industry of organized labor with the lobbies (that have politicians in their pockets) to maintain that power.

When the State has no power to empower, it has no power to destroy. Favoring either side of a coin by an institution with the authority to seize, confine, and kill is the very definition of fascism — the “third solution between socialism and capitalism.” We know far too well that when government butts its nose into the marketplace, bosses or union representation wins and workers lose.

What also gets left out of the Newspeak for the sheep is that organized workers and their bosses sign contracts, voluntarily. Gridlock in the negotiation process before contract signing can be resolved by more voluntary negotiating or mutually voluntary third party mediation in the private sector. A breach in a contract should be handled in the courts.

Keyword: “voluntary.” Anything else would be coercive. Coercive wages are theft. Coercive paid labor is wage slavery.