Posts Tagged ‘free market’

Will a free society be able to put out fires? Yes, after it puts out the inferno of the state! (8:17):

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Kevin Carson on the average Joe’s daily hell he heaven’izes to endure it tomorrow.

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The RAND Corporation estimates the legalization of marijuana would lower the untaxed price to $38/oz.

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News and views from around the web posted to the Wonderland Wire:

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News and views from around the web posted to the Wonderland Wire:

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Kevin Carson’s repsponse to comments on his previous post, “BP Would Be Toast in a Truly Free Market.”

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Only surprising that anyone would be surprised that a study finds India has the most fucked up web of bureaucracy.

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Kevin Carson on the government-forced liability cap for the oil industry.

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Kevin Carson on the density of conventional political discourse.

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Kevin Carson on the self-detonating reformism of politics.

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Benjamin Tucker on the source of capital, first published in an 1881 issue of Liberty, and later in his classic, Instead of a Book, by a Man Too Busy to Write One.

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Kevin Carson on ‘liberal’ bloggers seeing the G.O.P.’s “small government” heart of darkness.

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Response to a criticism of left-libertarianism posted at The Libertarian Standard by Juan Fernando Carpio.

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[This article is available to view or download in .pdf format]

A facebook friend, Andrew Taranto, posted:

Ayn Rand was, at least rhetorically speaking, a capitalist and an anti-libertarian. Shouldn’t we, libertarians, regard this as significant when considering the value of the term “capitalist”?

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via Charles “Rad Geek” Johnson’s blog: Freedom is not a conservative idea. It is not a prop for corporate power and the political-economic statist quo. Libertarianism is, in fact, a revolutionary doctrine, which would undermine and overthrow every form of state coercion and authoritarian control. If we want liberty in our lifetimes, the realities of our politics need to live up to the promise our principles—we should be radicals, not reformists; anarchists, not smaller-governmentalists; defenders of real freed markets and private property, not apologists for corporate capitalism, halfway privatization or existing concentrations of wealth. Libertarianism should be a people’s movement and a liberation movement, and we should take our cues not from what’s politically polite, but from what works for a revolutionary people-power movement. Here’s how:

Part One (10:00):

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