Posts Tagged ‘American history’

Prof. Chomsky delivers the 5th Annual Edward Said Memorial Lecture at Columbia University School for International Affairs for the Heyman Center for the Humanities. After paying homage to Edward Said stressing imperialism as central to our culture, Prof. Chomsky builds his case with telling quotes of American leaders rationalizing and denying genocide of indigenous ‘new worlders’ through U.S. terrorism in Latin America—Chile, Brazil, El Salvador, Panama, Nicaragua, Colombia—and the Middle East (1:03:46):

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Emma Goldman (1869-1940) played an integral role in further defining libertarian philosophy, but even more as an uncompromising activist against statist economics and the beginning of the warfare Empire. She laid the roots for a rational feminist movement when women were not accepted as capable of being anywhere near rational. Her writings and life show us that she never took an institution asserting authority as self-justifying. She was the person Leon Czolgosz, the assassin of President William McKinley, said inspired him to do so.

Known as an ‘anarcha-feminist’ to many, an advocate for liberty, reason, individualism, mutual cooperation, homesteading, atheism, free speech, female emancipation, sexual freedom, birth control, morally just insurrection, against politics, politicians, and the conscription of the working class on behalf of the oligarchs. A Russian immigrant exiled from the U.S. after three decades of life for her opposition to U.S. involvement in World War I. With her flaws, she’s one of the relatively few true heroes (heroines) in a U.S. history full of villains.

Part One: “Arriving in America” (9:26):

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Scrutinizing the legitimacy of authority is a basic foundation of any discourse on whether or not war is justified.

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Dr. Murray N. Rothbard — American economist of the Austrian School, reformed “big-O” Objectivist, self-proclaimed anarcho-capitalist — establishes what constitutes a just war, breaks down the oxymoron of neoliberal “humanitarian intervention” and lectures on “America’s Two Just Wars.” This lecture is in five parts totaling a little under 50 minutes. Seeing as Dr. Rothbard died in early Jan ’95 and his citing of Bosnia and Somalia in this lecture, this has to be 1994?

Part One (9:59):

Part Two (10:00):

Part Three (9:58):

Part Four (10:01):

Part Five (10:25):