via Charles “Rad Geek” Johnson’s blog: Freedom is not a conservative idea. It is not a prop for corporate power and the political-economic statist quo. Libertarianism is, in fact, a revolutionary doctrine, which would undermine and overthrow every form of state coercion and authoritarian control. If we want liberty in our lifetimes, the realities of our politics need to live up to the promise our principles—we should be radicals, not reformists; anarchists, not smaller-governmentalists; defenders of real freed markets and private property, not apologists for corporate capitalism, halfway privatization or existing concentrations of wealth. Libertarianism should be a people’s movement and a liberation movement, and we should take our cues not from what’s politically polite, but from what works for a revolutionary people-power movement. Here’s how:

Part One (10:00):

Part Two (9:59):

Part Three (10:00):

Part Four (10:04):

Part Five (9:57):

Part Six (9:03):

Part Seven – Q&A (9:38):

Part Eight – Q&A (10:24):

Part Nine – Q&A (8:24):

(h/t: Bile)

At the 2010 New Hampshire Liberty Forum, hosted by the Free State Project, Mr. Johnson sheds a light on:

  • the violent labor history of the U.S. and resistance by the anti-authoritarian left early in the 20th century;
  • the need for radical change in the zeitgeist;
  • the unlimited government intentions of the U.S. Constitution;
  • the etymology of ‘left’ and ‘right’ in political taxonomy and why libertarianism is as ‘left as it gets’;
  • the vitality that libertarians to stand against than war, police brutality, government policing itself and the enforcement of borders;
  • discusses ‘pervasive corporate capitalism’, wage slavery and the pluralist nature of a participatory market freed from coercion; and
  • the moral, strategic value in solidarity with the most downtrodden.

Comments
  1. […] If you do decide you want to interface with the tea partiers to try to win them over; this is perfect material for doing […]

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